Frame shifts and catastrophic events: the attacks of September 11, 2001, and New York Times’s portrayals of Arafat and Sharon.

Article: Dente Ross, S. & Bantimaroudis, P. (2006). Frame shifts and catastrophic events: the attacks of September 11, 2001, and New York Times’s portrayals of Arafat and Sharon. Mass Communication & Society, 9(1), pp. 85-101.

In this research media coverage is being scrutinized and the influence of specific events on that coverage. In special, this article is about the shifting of frames of two important leaders in the Israeli Palestinian conflict; Arafat and Sharon. The authors set out a really broad theoretical framework about framing and specify it to durability and framing of leaders, which can be used in further research about Israel and Palestine. They conclude in this research that the media coverage of the leaders increased significantly after September 11 with nearly 80%. Also noteworthy is the difference in framing. In general, Arafat is more framed as foe and Sharon more as friend of the United States. But the coverage of ongoing violence in Palestine and Israel was mainly neutral. Not only is the theoretical groundwork relevant but also the findings about which frames the New York Times used covering the conflict.