Posts Tagged ‘Compassion Fatigue’

 
 

Does a picture say more then a thousand words?

This thesis describes the role pictures play in the sensemaking proces of the public about conflict situations. This thesis is in Dutch.

Author: linschakenraad
Posted on: November 11, 2010

Humanitarian branding and the media; the case of Amnesty International.

Vestergaard, A. (2008). Humanitarian branding and the media; the case of Amnesty International. Journal of language and politics, 7(3), 471-493
This article explores how NGO’s work in their field of tension between the need for visibility and a greater dependence on media and their public’s skepticism with the existing ‘compassion fatigue’. According to the author, NGO’s [...]

Author: linschakenraad
Posted on: September 6, 2010

Compassion, morality and the media

Tester, K. (2001). Compassion, morality and the media. Buckingham: Open University Press.
This book provides an answer to the question: ‘what do the reports and representations of the suffering and misery of others actually mean to media users?’ The concepts of compassion and compassion fatigue play an important role in this answer. He also explains the [...]

Author: Eva Dekker
Posted on: June 30, 2010

Compassion fatigue: how the media sell disease, famine, war and death

Moeller, S.D. (1999). Compassion fatigue: how the media sell disease, famine, war and death. New York: Routledge.
In this book, Moeller investigates how television news, newspapers and magazines have covered international issues of war, catastrophes, famine and disease and the impact of this coverage on the audience of the news media. Compassion fatigue is the key [...]

Author: Eva Dekker
Posted on: June 30, 2010

Compassion fatigue: communication and burnout toward social problems

Kinnick, K.N., Krugman, D.M. & Cameron, G.T. (1996). Compassion fatigue: communication and burnout toward social problems. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 73(3), 687-707.
This study establishes the concept of compassion fatigue in relation to social problems. In order to measure this concept, the authors discuss different theories of emotional burnout by overexposure through the media. They [...]

Author: Eva Dekker
Posted on: June 30, 2010